~DG
~DG

~DG

The
~DG
command downloads an ASCII Hex representation of a graphic image. If
.GRF
is not the specified file extension,
.GRF
is automatically appended.

Download Graphics

For more saving and loading options when downloading files, see ~DY.
Format:
~DGd:o.x,t,w,data
Parameters
Details
d =
device to store image
Values:
R:
,
E:
,
B:
, and
A:
Default:
R:
o =
image name
Values:
1
to
8
alphanumeric characters
Default:
if a name is not specified, UNKNOWN is used
x =
extension
Format:
.GRF
t =
total number of bytes in graphic
See the formula in the examples below.
w =
number of bytes per row
See the formula in the examples below.
data =
ASCII hexadecimal string defining image
The data string defines the image and is an ASCII hexadecimal representation of the image. Each character represents a horizontal nibble of four dots.
This is the key for the examples that follow:
x
=
width of the graphic in millimeters
y
=
height of the graphic in millimeters
z
=
dots/mm
=
print density of the printer being programmed
8
=
bits/byte
These are some example related to the
~DG
command:
Example:
To determine the
t
parameter use this formula:
(xz/8) x yz = totalbytes
Example:
To determine the correct t parameter for a graphic 8 mm wide, 16 mm high, and a print density of 8 dots/mm, use this formula:
8 x 128 = 1024
t = 1024
Raise any portion of a byte to the next whole byte.
Example:
To determine the
w
parameter (the width in terms of bytes per row) use this formula:
xz/8 = (totalbytes)/(row)
w = 8
Example:
To determine the correct
w
parameter for a graphic 8 mm wide and a print density of 8 dots/mm, use this formula:
(8 x 8)/8 = 8 bytes
w = 8
Raise any portion of a byte to the next whole byte.
Parameter
w
is the first value in the
t
calculation.
The data parameter is a string of hexadecimal numbers sent as a representation of the graphic image. Each hexadecimal character represents a horizontal nibble of four dots. For example, if the first four dots of the graphic image are white and the next four black, the dot-by-dot binary code is 00001111. The hexadecimal representation of this binary value is 0F. The entire graphic image is coded in this way, and the complete graphic image is sent as one continuous string of hexadecimal values.
Example:
This is an example of using the
~DG
command to load a checkerboard pattern into DRAM. The name used to store the graphic is
SAMPLE.GRF
:
Comments:
Do not use spaces or periods when naming your graphics. Always use different names for different graphics.
If two graphics with the same name are sent to the printer, the first graphic is erased and replaced by the second graphic.