How Commands Are Documented
How Commands Are Documented

How Commands Are Documented

Description:
The first paragraph(s) provides an explanation of how the command is used, what it is capable of, and any defining characteristics it has.
Format:
The format explains how the command is syntactically arranged and what parameters it contains. For example, the
^B8
command prints a EAN-8 bar code. The format of the
^B8
command is:
^B8o,h,f,g
. It is arranged with the caret symbol (
^
), the command code (
B8
), and the parameters and are replaced with supported values.
Parameters:
In the parameters table, if a command has values that can be defined to make its function more specific, these are outlined as parameters.
Still using the
^B8
example, the
h
parameter is defined as:
h =
bar code height (in dots)
Values:
1
to
32000
Default:
value set by
^BY
If the command has no parameters – for example
~JA
(Cancel All) – the parameter section is removed, indicating that the format of the command (
~JA
) is acceptable ZPL II code.
Examples:
When the command is best clarified in context, an example of the ZPL II code is provided. Text indicating exact code entered is printed in an easily recognizable Courier font. An example of code using the
^B8
command looks like this:
^XA ^FO50,50 ^B8N,100,Y,N ^FD1234567^FS ^XZ
Notice that the
^B8
parameter letters have been replaced with real values that apply to the command. In this example
N
,
100
,
Y
,
N
have been entered.
Comments:
A Comments section (if used) will show notes that are of value to a programmer, warnings of potential command interactions, or command-specific information that should be taken into consideration.
Comments are also included next to parameters if they apply directly to a particular setting.